Eightfold: Unlearn, Learn, Reinvent
© 2018 Getty Images
The need for quality talent is so great that those who excel at unlearning, learning, and reinventing themselves have a higher probability of success for overcoming common biases including race, gender, age, and academic background. Finding employees and candidates who have the ability and initiative to constantly reinvent themselves is the goal of every company today, though it isn’t easy.
Above the Fold - Perkins Reauthorization
© Penn Commercial Business/Technical School in Washington, PA
Congress last week passed and the president today signed legislation reauthorizing the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act, which provides important funding for programs focused on the academic, career, and technical skills development for high school and higher education students. Highlights of the reauthorization include new opportunities for partnerships between employers and educators to improve student preparation for in-demand jobs, measures that improve alignment with other workforce development programs, and increased program accountability.
A New Lens for the Aging Workforce
© 2018 Getty Images
For hiring managers to attract top talent, they must view the aging workforce through a new lens. Today, we consider those 65+ to be “older” and less skilled or capable. But we must shift our perspective on age. The average life expectancy for a man is 80 years old, and for a woman the average is 85 years. A 50-year-old is no longer a “senior.” 
Above the Fold - Pledge to the American Worker
© U.S. Chamber of Commerce
Last week the administration launched what it termed “the next step” in its economic agenda: a sweeping, administration-wide effort to equip the American workforce to succeed in the modern economy. To propel this initiative forward, it is seeking advice and cooperation from leaders in business and education. Our message at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce is simple: Count us in. We look forward to continuing our work with the administration on this issue of critical importance to the entire business community.
Military Pathways Summit
© 2018 Getty Images
Throughout the day’s conversations, several major issues were acknowledged and summit participants and attendees discussed their current and future plans to work together to tackle these challenges. Where the morning portion of the summit centered on the challenges experienced and identified by government and military officials, the afternoon session addressed how all sectors share similar challenges in the talent marketplace and how many corporate solutions could be applied to inspire real change for the military and our veterans.
July_EverFi_Endeavor Shoe_FeaturedImage
© EverFi
Since the fall of 2017, thousands of students across the country have completed the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation’s STEM Scholars digital program. Throughout the course, students engage with content that reinforces key STEM skills and learn how STEM careers connect to their interests and daily lives. See how the program highlights exciting science, technology, engineering, and math challenges from a connected, technology-fueled world. 
The Future of Training at Honeywell
© Honeywell
Companies, like those last night at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation reception on Building the Workforce of the Future, understand that within their walls lies a tremendous amount of institutional knowledge and human life experience. Last night we saw two companies, Honeywell and Toyota, who aren’t afraid to dip a toe in the water of the future of training. They are transforming the learning experience for their workforce by leveraging a combination of virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR).
FutureProofing - Wyoming Machine
© Provided by FreeEnterprise.com
The co-owner of the Wyoming Machine sheet metal company in Stacy, Minnesota that makes armored Humvees, steel spokes and other manufactured parts, Tapani posted an ad to fill a production job at their plant. Two months later she didn’t get a single applicant. Hiring skilled welders and laser operators was already tough. And in the manufacturing space winning the heated competition for good workers could mean the difference between profitability and closing the door. The American Welding Society anticipates a shortage of about 400,000 operators by 2024. But Tapani and Wyoming didn’t take the bad news laying down.

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