FutureProofing - ExxonMobil
© ExxonMobil
Like many countries around the world, the United States faces a shortage of highly-skilled science and technology workers. In the past decade, employment growth in STEM occupations has markedly outpaced growth in non-STEM occupations, and while there will be an estimated 3.4 million STEM jobs available between 2015 to 2025, only about 1.4 million workers will be qualified to fill them, according to a study by Deloitte and the Manufacturing Institute. ExxonMobil is taking this challenge head on – but it’s not doing so alone.
STEM Scholars 2018 Wrap Up
© EverFi
A yet to be released report from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation STEM Scholars program reveals student knowledge gains, behaviors, and attitudinal changes across the country. The findings provide an analysis of data from more than 4,000 students in 27 schools across Michigan, Tennessee, West Virginia, and Texas. Overall, findings suggest that connecting students’ personal interests and strengths to STEM skills helps students better see themselves in STEM. 
YouScience Aptitude Testing
© 2018 Getty Images
What do you love to do? It’s a question that drives career planning nationwide. That seemingly harmless probe is the assumption behind interest-only assessments, which have historically dominated career guidance efforts. However, these assessments are failing employers and students. What would happen if you measured that person's aptitude?
FutureProofing - UpSkill Houston
© 2018 Getty Images
In order to stay globally competitive, Houston’s industries needed to attract, train, and hire workers into technical careers that require more than a high school diploma but less than a four-year college degree. To address the skills gap, Greater Houston Partnership— a group of 1,200 companies in the 11 county Houston region—took on the responsibility of retraining workers and strengthening the talent pipeline.
A New Lens for the Aging Workforce
© 2018 Getty Images
For hiring managers to attract top talent, they must view the aging workforce through a new lens. Today, we consider those 65+ to be “older” and less skilled or capable. But we must shift our perspective on age. The average life expectancy for a man is 80 years old, and for a woman the average is 85 years. A 50-year-old is no longer a “senior.” 
Above the Fold - Pledge to the American Worker
© U.S. Chamber of Commerce
Last week the administration launched what it termed “the next step” in its economic agenda: a sweeping, administration-wide effort to equip the American workforce to succeed in the modern economy. To propel this initiative forward, it is seeking advice and cooperation from leaders in business and education. Our message at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce is simple: Count us in. We look forward to continuing our work with the administration on this issue of critical importance to the entire business community.
July_EverFi_Endeavor Shoe_FeaturedImage
© EverFi
Since the fall of 2017, thousands of students across the country have completed the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation’s STEM Scholars digital program. Throughout the course, students engage with content that reinforces key STEM skills and learn how STEM careers connect to their interests and daily lives. See how the program highlights exciting science, technology, engineering, and math challenges from a connected, technology-fueled world. 
BAG_CareerEvent_FeaturedImage
© Bridging America's Gap
Over the past five years or so, workforce data has been sending a strong message: there is a difference between the expectation that employers have of the skills and competencies that a new employee will have on day one and what the employee is actually capable of doing. The only way to ensure skills translate into successful career paths is to provide students and their families with exposure to and awareness of the jobs and career paths available across industries right in their own community.
The Future of Training at Honeywell
© Honeywell
Companies, like those last night at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation reception on Building the Workforce of the Future, understand that within their walls lies a tremendous amount of institutional knowledge and human life experience. Last night we saw two companies, Honeywell and Toyota, who aren’t afraid to dip a toe in the water of the future of training. They are transforming the learning experience for their workforce by leveraging a combination of virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR).

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