Reports

August 22, 2016

Recent federal legislation, such as the Every Student Succeeds Act, has brought national attention to improving both college and career readiness. Career development is a critical component, but there is widespread dissatisfaction with the quality of today’s services. Best practices are well-positioned to better inform and prepare students for the world of work; however, there is one notable limitation—they are not designed to foster employer leadership. As companies look to create a pipeline of talent to compete on a global stage, how can the business community secure and maintain the supports it needs to play an expanded role in career development?

September 19, 2012

One key to thriving in a competitive global economy is a properly skilled workforce that can innovate, create new products and services, and bring them to market quickly and efficiently. America remains a leader in innovation, but its workforce is falling behind. Education and workforce development systems have not kept pace with the demands of the 21st century, and we all bear the costs of this failure. American businesses spend billions of dollars each year training their employees and pour billions more into education. Despite these substantial investments, employers continue to report that too many job seekers are unqualified for modern jobs.

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