Reports
September 22, 2015

Mapping the Food Security Landscape

Takeaways

Mapping the Food Security Landscape aims to help the private sector maximize their impact in the food security space

American companies understand that strengthening individuals, communities, and ecosystems around the globe is good for business. The Corporate Citizenship Center’s latest report, Mapping the Food Security Landscape, aims to help the private sector maximize their impact in the food security space.

In this report, Mapping the Food Security Landscape, CCC researched the different types of food security work performed by nonprofits, NGOs, foundations, and government agencies so that companies can identify new and compelling ways they can support this type of programming.

Comprehensive lists of food security programs are already available from organizations like the United Nation’s Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the World Food Programme (WFP), and the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). While those lists can be illustrative, they may omit analysis that would allow individuals to investigate how those organizations approach the problem of food security and their thematic concentrations. This project looks to complement that work by including information and analysis to allow anyone, particularly businesses, to make better decisions about how to develop and accelerate their own food security programming.

Mapping the Food Security Landscape begins with a brief history of food security, along with a description of food security today. After explaining the research methodology, the report outlines some significant findings, including the differences in how the organizations define food security and the various types of projects they launch. It concludes with thoughts for future work and collaboration.  While this analysis is not considered to be exhaustive, it is meant to be representative of the space.

Access the Mapping Food Security Database

CCC is hosting a public, Web-based version of the database of the organizations featured in this analysis, available here. The database lists all 70 organizations profiled, including their definition of food security, topics of concentration, examples of projects, and links to their websites.