Data

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation's Data-Driven Innovation Project explores the rapid advancements happening in the digital economy as well as the inventive use of data for good. The promise of bigger and better data is a future of greater opportunity and growth. The Foundation is conducting research activities and a series of events around the country in order to highlight this potential.

We encourage you to read the blog posts and research reports here to gain a full understanding of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation's work on data-driven innovation.

Be sure to read our in-depth report, The Future of Data-Driven Innovation

STEM Scholars 2018 Wrap Up
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A yet to be released report from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation STEM Scholars program reveals student knowledge gains, behaviors, and attitudinal changes across the country. The findings provide an analysis of data from more than 4,000 students in 27 schools across Michigan, Tennessee, West Virginia, and Texas. Overall, findings suggest that connecting students’ personal interests and strengths to STEM skills helps students better see themselves in STEM. 
Innovations in Early Ed
© 2018 Getty Images
We often think of the use of technology in early education as detrimental to child development. Yet, the reality is that technological innovations have an incredibly valuable role to play in the classroom. By looking at the technology readily available in the world today, AEL, Wonderschool, and ELL are paving the way for the next breakthrough innovations in early childhood education and care.
YouScience Aptitude Testing
© 2018 Getty Images
What do you love to do? It’s a question that drives career planning nationwide. That seemingly harmless probe is the assumption behind interest-only assessments, which have historically dominated career guidance efforts. However, these assessments are failing employers and students. What would happen if you measured that person's aptitude?
NAEP Scores Urge Back to Basics
Last week, the results of the 2017 administration of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), also known as our “Nation’s Report Card,” were released. Not only do these numbers forecast a lack of proficient workers for future businesses, but they also show how we are failing to provide a valuable education and opportunities for the students who need it the most.
Where Data and Technology Converge to Improve the Talent Marketplace

Our meeting on March 7, the first in a series led as a joint effort between the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation and Lumina Foundation, kicked off an eight month sprint of work to improve the talent marketplace. All of the organizations involved are experts on today’s emerging technologies, such as semantic web standards (e.g., linked data), distributed ledger technologies (e.g., blockchain), artificial intelligence, and machine learning. We know that these technologies have the power, if leveraged properly, to transform the talent marketplace and drive future innovation. 

Clearer Signals, Less Noise

Closing the communications gap requires investments on both sides of the equation. Employers and education providers must work together to ensure the signals are accurate, clear, and verifiable. As the use of digital credentials expands, job seekers will gain unprecedented insight into the link between what they learn and the sort of employment opportunities that exist in their community -- or around the country. And for employers, the improved signal-to-noise ratio means a higher percentage of qualified applicants for each job opening, and improved ability of hiring managers to identify the best candidates for their position.

Validating Credentials is Key

Economic mobility rests on the opportunities that individuals are granted or seek out. Education plays a big part of that, which is why many professionals are now looking for continuous ways to improve their skillsets. But how do you validate that people have earned what they say they've earned? The reality is that people lie about their credentials. The solution? Use advanced technology to make credentials trackable and unfakeable. 

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