Workforce Training

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation publishes content on workforce training and related issues. Find and access current and archived items in our database. 

January 29, 2019
Greater Houston Partnership, My Life As
© Greater Houston Partnership

When we ask young people “What do you want to be when you grow up?” the answers generally include—doctor, professional athlete, musician, actress. These are careers that we see every day in movies, TV, and real life.

December 27, 2018
3 New Years Resolutions for Learning and Development
© Photo provided by Udemy
With unemployment at a historic low, companies are coming up with creative ways to hire fast and at scale. But, as Udemy’s 2018 Skills Gap Report found, companies will see diminishing returns if they don’t invest in their workforce’s ongoing learning and development. 
January 3, 2019
Businesses Are Working With Students to Better Bridge Classrooms With Careers
© Photo by Ian Wagreich / © U.S. Chamber of Commerce
Now more than ever, the success of American business and the effectiveness of our education systems are inextricably linked. Business leaders must be even more engaged in ensuring that our education and workforce systems are preparing learners beginning at an early age for the increasing demands of the globally competitive 21st century knowledge economy.
January 9, 2019
Investing in Hidden Talent, COABE
© 2019 Getty Images
As President Donald Trump moves forward with his pledge to rebuild America’s infrastructure, we’re going to need more workers. And as the nation looks to rebuild the American middle class, we’re going to need more people who are workforce-ready to support it. But we find ourselves in a difficult holding pattern.
December 4, 2018
Q4 Small Business Index
© U.S. Chamber of Commerce
Addressing our country’s workforce development challenges is no longer a big business problem. In fact, small businesses may yet deliver the most innovative and important solutions for creating real pathways to opportunity in today’s economy.
December 12, 2018
Build vs Buy, General Assembly
© General Assembly
The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that by 2020, there will be 1 million more computing jobs than workers to fill them. Demand for jobs in data science alone has grown 300 percent over the last four years. Tech skills like cloud computing and user interface design top the list of the most in-demand skills.  It’s a challenge that stems, in part, from the well-documented divide between higher education and the world of work. And the challenge is only accelerating as the shelf life of skills shrinks. 
November 27, 2018
The Age of Retraining, Featured Image
© The 74

When economists and editorialists speak in worried tones about America’s “skills gap,” they’re referring to the mounting number of jobs that require some degree of technical know-how and the relative dearth of qualified candidates to fill them.

November 1, 2018
Talent Forward 2018 - Above the Fold
© Photo by Ian Wagreich / © U.S. Chamber of Commerce
There’s a lot of work to do and not enough skilled people to do it. That was the message U.S. Chamber President and CEO delivered at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation’s Talent Forward event. “There’s no question that the American workforce is the finest in the world,” said Donohue. “But, if we are going to keep that advantage, if we are going to keep the promise of opportunity to future generations of Americans, we have some work to do.”
October 25, 2018
Blog Image - Apprenticeships
© 2018 Getty Images
Many large organizations have this same challenge. And yet, there is a degree gap - “a discrepancy between the demand for a college degree in job postings and the employees who are currently in that job who have a college degree.” In an analysis of more than 26 million job postings, the degree gap was found to be significant, according to a study by Accenture, Harvard Business School, and Grads of Life. The study attributes degree inflation to two key factors: the fast-changing nature of many middle-skills jobs and employers’ misperceptions of the economics of investing in quality talent at the non-graduate level.

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