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The New York Times columnist and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Tom Friedman discusses the impact of civics education with Stefanie Sanford, chief of global policy and external relations at the College Board.

Former U.S. Secretary of Education Rod Paige.JPG

Former U.S. Secretary of Education Rod PaigeJPG
Former U.S. Secretary of Education Rod Paige joins Suzanne Clark, president of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, to talk about why civics knowledge matters to America.

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Gov. Doug Ducey
Governor Doug Ducey, who established a program in Arizona that recognizes students for their civics achievements, speaks to the journalist, author, and distinguished historian A’Lelia Bundles about the changes the program made across America and the dialogue it created on a bipartisan level.

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Ken Winneg.JPG
Ken Winneg, the managing director of survey research for the Annenberg Public Policy Center, kicks off the Civics Forward program by presenting findings from Annenberg Public Policy Center (APPC) Civics Knowledge Survey.

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Scott MontgomeryJPG
From left to right: Scott Montgomery, editor-in-chief and chief content officer for Education Week, speaks with Jillian Balow, Wyoming Superintendent; Karrin Taylor Robson, secretary of the Arizona Board of Regents; and Gail Sider, a teacher at the Hutchinson Elementary School about bringing civics education back to the classroom.

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Patrick Madden.JPG
From left to right: Patrick Madden, executive director at the National Archives Foundation speaks with Mylayna Albright, assistant vice president of citizenship and sustainability at AT&T; Tara Leweling, vice president of stakeholder relations and corporate thought leadership at Allstate; and Jennifer Lowe, vice president for national strategy and engagement at Boeing about the leading corporate examples of civics education and literacy.

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Cheryl OldhamJPG
From left to right: Cheryl Oldham, senior vice president of the center for education and workforce at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation, talks about the 21st-century approach to civics education with Tim Bailey, director of education at the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History; Mia Charity, chief development officer at the Close Up Foundation; Louise Dubé, executive director of iCivics; and Lucian Spataro, chief academic officer at the Joe Foss Institute.

CIVICS FORWARD

Friday, September 27, 2019 - 8:00am to 1:00pm
U.S. Chamber of Commerce
1615 H Street, NW
Washington, DC 20062
United States

On September 27, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation hosted CIVICS FORWARD to discuss the future of civic education, civic engagement, and civil discourse in America. We brought together leaders in business, education, and government to discuss how we can prepare the next generation for the awesome responsibilities they bear in a democracy.

Why does this matter?

The United States has posted declines in various measures of civic awareness and participation across generations. Informed and active citizens make for a stronger country, a stronger economy, and a stronger workforce. This is essential for our continued prosperity.

What is the solution?

Civic learning occurs throughout one’s life in schools, in family life, throughout our communities, and in the workplace. Business is uniquely positioned to help ensure that the next generation of Americans has the knowledge, skills, and disposition to take a productive role in civic life.

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation is working to reverse the decline in civic knowledge and participation. Our work is nonpartisan, and it is predicated on the belief that business has a responsibility to support greater civic knowledge and engagement at the local and national level.

Webcast

Civics Forward Highlights:

Former U.S. Secretary of Education Rod Paige joins the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation’s Civics Forward summit to talk about why civics knowledge matters: “Everybody has a part of the civics obligation. It doesn’t matter about your profession or social environment. You are an American, and that’s something we are all equal in.”

The New York Times columnist and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Tom Friedman discusses the impact of civics education and literacy in the digital era: "Technology is going deep, but the values, ethics, norms, standards, and regulations that govern technology are analog. If we don’t have our civic values right, we are going to be in a bad place."

Gov. Doug Ducey, who established a program in Arizona that recognizes students for their civics achievements, speaks at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation’s Civics Foward summit about the changes the program made across America and the dialogue it created on a bipartisan level.