Bye Bye 2022
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Looking back on 2022 fills me with pride and a sense of awe at all the team has accomplished in 12 short months. The Center for Education and Workforce at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation continues to conceive of and lead long-term systems change in education and workforce—the underpinnings of American competitiveness and prosperity.
Mother working on laptop with child in lap
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Right now, maybe more than any other time in modern history, working parents are devoting significant amounts of time, energy, and resources into balancing their roles at home and in the workplace.  Parents must consider various factors in determining the level and type of childcare solutions that best meet their needs.
Student raising hand in class
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Research suggests that 1 in 4 children in the U.S. has a vision problem—an estimated 12.1 million children. As we look to end the social impact of poor vision, we must advocate for higher level changes at the government and private sector levels. It’s clear that with so many larger societal issues linked to poor vision – like education, poverty, good health, and even gender equity – vision is a cause we must address if we are to create resilient societies. 
Two students sitting at a table facing a laptop
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At a time when we need to address STEM labor shortages, we cannot afford to leave segments of our population behind. The National Science Foundation (NSF) supports a strategy to address these issues through the newly funded Community College Presidents’ Initiative in STEM Education. Community colleges, serving the most diverse student body in higher education, are fertile ground for effective diversification of the STEM workforce. 51% of community college students taking college credit classes are students of color.

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