Blog

June 29, 2018
FutureProofing - PNC
© Provided by FreeEnterprise.com
How do you pitch giving back as good business? And how do you make a financial services company care—really care—about making a dent in early childhood education, an issue that doesn’t show up anywhere on the balance sheet? These were the questions that the leaders of the PNC Foundation had to answer if PNC was going to play a huge role in improving early childhood education in the communities they serve. The research was clear and irrefutable. The benefits of quality early childhood education are not only social, but economic, with a benefit as high as $16 for every dollar invested. And today’s preschoolers are tomorrow’s workforce.
June 19, 2018
alt="Community Success"

At the backbone of PNC’s corporate responsibility efforts is the belief that when communities prosper, their business prospers. PNC supports the communities where it conducts business through job creation, local infrastructure, small business loans, financial education, and sponsorships.

June 5, 2018
Building the Workforce of the Future
© U.S. Chamber of Commerce
On Monday, the U.S. Chamber revealed a new art installation, “Building the Workforce of the Future,” showcasing some of America’s leading employers in workforce development efforts. These employers are: PNC, The Home Depot, IBM, Microsoft, ExxonMobil, the Greater Houston Partnership, Wyoming Machine, and Novelis. The display illustrates the work of these companies, across the four phases of the nation’s talent pipeline, to close the skills gap and cultivate a highly-trained workforce of tomorrow.
May 21, 2018
USCC Opioid Event

At the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation, we believe businesses have a critical role to play in improving the communities where we live, work, and play. Because when communities do well, so does business. This same belief was the backdrop of a recent event hosted by the U.S.

May 15, 2018
CPCC Apprenticeships_Featured
Vocational learning has evolved over the years. In the past, it referred to individuals learning particular skills in fields such as welding, plumbing and automotive services. Today’s vocational training looks vastly different. Students are acquiring skills in advanced manufacturing, mechatronics, computer-integrated machining, and other highly technical fields of study. Classrooms have been replaced with employers’ manufacturing headquarters, and students are finding employment before they even graduate college.

Pages